For a while now I have been planning on converting to an electric car.  I got a really good deal on a Probe GT. Now I could just go ahead and buy a conversion kit and put it all together and do what so many before me has done, with the same results. But I could never do that. If I am to take on a big project I have to push the envelope and do something no one has done before.  And that was to do something that would in some way advance the technology of the electric car. And I am not an engineer of any sorts. What I am is a person with reasonable skills and intuition. I also believe that if the electric car is to actually dethrone the conventional combustion motor,  it’s going to have to come from us. Detroit has too much to lose and not enough to gain.  So having nearly two years of complete freedom from Arduous labor, I was able to focus my energies on solving the biggest limitation facing the electric car. Range. The obvious answer to range is more batteries, but there’s a problem, more batteries means more weight and more weight means more drag and more drag means less efficiency. The obvious solution was find a way to charge the batteries while in use. However you can not charge a battery while you’re discharging a battery.  The obvious solution to this problem was to divide the battery pack into two separate battery packs. With one pack driving at a time, and this is nothing new people have been putting dual packs in for sometime now. The trick was finding a way to charge the packs while they’re offline. Solar is one option, but a 4ft solar panel will only return about half of the energy spent over the course of an hour. We can also harness kinetic energy and friction, and send that back to the batteries. But here lies another problem, to actually charge the battery, these sources have to produce enough voltage to push past the batteries natural resistance. In the case of a 12v battery you need about 14v to actually push past the resistance. Another inhibiting factor is time. How long does it take to charge the whole bank? To charge the batteries fast would take a lot of amperage. So I had toyed with the idea of running dual high out alternators, one shafted directly to the electric motor, and the other belted to the first. The Idea is to series the alternators together generating 300+ amps. Here’s the puzzler, on the bench it works, just as it logically should. However once all put together, there was too much drag, and too much convergence(energy lost due to heat) that hardly anything made it back to the batteries. So I was back to square one. I had spit in the eye of Thermodynamics, and paid the price.  it took me a while to piece it all together, but here’s the problem, it’s the alternators themselves, and how they work. The alternator is made up of key components, the Rotor and the Stator coil. The stator coil is a tightly wound spool of copper wire. The rotor is a strong magnet, that spins inside the stator, creating a magnetic field in the stator, that is then converted to electric current. However, as every magnet has a north and south polarity. This will also create a counter motive force, this is caused by the convergence of the magnetic fields created by both north and south.  Since the fields are opposing they attract and counter act each other, which essentially stops the rotor.  So how do you overcome the counter motive force and keep the electromagnetic fields stabilized, long enough to charge the batteries.  I had to finally admit defeat on this. As I could not see a way around. So far there was no seemingly way to actually charge the batteries while the car was moving, the best I could do was increase the range about 5 miles. But as I was completely and totally dejected and confused,  I didn’t give up. It took me several months to break it all down and see where it went wrong.  The problem was in the batteries themselves. While the technologies in the motor and the controllers and the electronics in general have grown exponentially, batteries have not. And they pose great environmental hazards, when they have reached the end of their service. So that’s when I decided that the batteries had to go. They cost far too much, they are cumbersome, and add too much weight to the car. They are essentially the Achilles heal of the electric car. What we need is a whole new idea of looking at energy storage.  It was in one of those moments when my mind was completely on something completely unrelated, when it hit me. The whole solution to the problem was in the way the magnets and the coils interact. By understanding how the magnetic currents flow and how that flow interacts with the copper windings. So I hit up the ole reliable Youtube, and seen some little home-made projects, but nothing really substantial.  Then it dawned on me Ed Leedskalnin had just what I needed. Flywheels. A Flywheel is an energy storage device. And Ed made himself an unbelievable one. It was all in understanding the magnetic flow. On Ed’s flywheel all the magnetic currents pushed into the center where they are channeled through copper plate, where it is converted to electrical current. Which is then drawn off the wheel through electrical wiring.   What is strange is that this works because of the geometrical shape Ed formed the copper plating into. I am not quite sure of the significance of the six pointed star in Ed’s flywheel, but who am I to argue with Genius.  So with Ed’s concepts I set out to build my own flywheel. I thought I would start small like all those youtube videos. Sorry I do not own a camera of any kind so I can to talk myself through describing the construction of the flywheel.  I started with a pair of old CD’s. Mark one CD N. And the Other S. Then draw out the hours of the clock on each CD. Using extremely powerful rare earth bar magnets I paired up 24 for each CD. The Magnets I used for my first prototype had 58ft pounds of Magnetic force. Pairing them gives you 116 per pair. So watch your fingers you don’t want to get pinched pairing them up. Taking the CD marked North. Place the paired magnets on each hour line Going North/south. And similarly South/North on the CD marked S. Once the magnets were secured in their proper place and to their proper polarity, I tool some 1/2 wide copper plating and molded it into the six pointed star pattern that Ed Leedskalnin had used. Then I attached Copper to the CD’s. At this point it looks more like a Tesla Turbine than a flywheel. The Flywheel is mounted Vertically on an axis, within a plastic housing. Then I mounted four two-inch Iron ball bearings,  one in each corner of the wheel so to speak. The bearing are mounted to spin on its axes much like Earth spins. The bearings need to be iron, or other composite that can be turned into an electromagnet. As the flywheel spins, its producing 48 non converging magnetic fields that are pushed down into the center of the wheel, there is it forced into the copper plating, converting it to electricity. And at a mere 3000rpm my one little flywheel is putting out 18volts continuous current. Now imagine how much more I’ll get when I series 6 more of these together?

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